How to Build a Node.js App for Production: The Ultimate Walk Through

Before you invest your time and money into building a Node app, you’ll want to make sure it can stand on its own as an independent product. To do this, you’ll need to create a production-ready app that has all of the features and functionality for end users. This blog post explains how to build a Node app for production by creating an independent, standalone framework from which users can launch without needing other dependencies. To build a production-ready app you’ll need to follow these steps:

Create a Package.json

A package.json file is the foundation for any node application, so it’s the first step towards creating a production-ready app. In the root directory of your app, create a new JSON file called package.json. Inside, you’ll need to add all of the necessary app information. The package.json file is structured as a dictionary, so each element will be nested inside the preceding element. The first thing you’ll need to add is the name and version. For the next section, you’ll need to decide whether you’re building a server-side app or a hybrid app. A server-side app is built using a node server and an API, while a hybrid app is built using a combination of front-end and back-end technologies. Server-side apps are typically used for data-intensive apps like e-commerce, while hybrids are best suited for apps that need to display data from a server but don’t require heavy data processing.

Add 3rd Party Dependencies

If you’re building a server-side app with a RESTful API, then you’ll want to add 3rd party dependencies for your server, database, and packages for data transformation. For server dependencies, you can use a module like express for a more robust server, or hapi if you want a more enterprise-level server. For database, you’ll want to add a package like mongoDB or Postgres. For data transformation, you can use packages like the JSON or JS object parsing or the JSON schema validation. For an example of each, see our building a data-intensive Node app guide. For hybrid apps, you’ll add packages for things like user authentication, timers, and error handling.

Create an Environment Folder

Each project has a unique environment that needs to be modified based on the server or back-end language, dependencies, and runtime. This environment will also need to change based on the user’s environment like if they’re using a Mac or Windows. For this reason, you’ll want to create an environment folder for the following: – server environment – db environment – client environment Inside the environment folder, create a new folder for each environment. Inside each folder, create a config file for each environment. Add an NODE_ENV variable to each config file representing the current environment. Inside the server environment config file, add a server variable. Inside the client environment, add a client variable. Inside the db environment, add a db variable. Inside each config file, add a path variable.

Enable Prod Build Commands

For a production-ready app, you’ll need to set up your build commands to bundle and minify code and change the server environment to production. For the build command, you can use a tool like Webpack or Parcel. For the server environment, you can use the PM2 process manager to start the server. PM2 is an open source tool that allows you to run a Node server and manage it. For the database environment, you’ll want to use the Postgres database. For the client environment, you can use the Babel package for transformation. For the client build command, you can use the JS minify plugin.

Create a Startup Script

For production-ready apps, you’ll want to create a startup script that creates the server and database environments and initializes the database. First, create a new folder for the script. Inside the folder, create a new file named “startup.js”. In the script file, add the following code: This startup script will create a server environment, create a db environment, initialize the database with data, and then open up the server and start the database. You can add additional functionality to this script by adding more code. For example, you can add code to load or generate a starter model or create an index page.

Add Independent Dependencies

If you’ve built a server-side app, you’ll want to add independent versions of the 3rd party dependencies. For hybrid apps, you’ll want to add independent versions of the packages needed to transform data and authenticate users. For server-side apps, you can use the npm install –save package> command to add a dependency to the package.json file. For hybrid apps, you can use the Yarn command to add a dependency to the package.json file. For server-side apps, you can use the npm install package> –save command to add a dependency to the package.json file and install the dependency in the current directory. For hybrid apps, you can use the Yarn command to add a dependency to the package.json file and install the dependency in the current directory.

Create a New Folder for Routes and MVC Separation

For a production-ready app, you’ll want to separate your routes from the MVC and keep them in a new folder. For route separation, create a new folder called routes. Inside the routes folder, create a new file called “routes.js”. For MVC separation, create a new folder called models. Inside the models folder, create a new file called “models.js”. The routes folder will contain the route and API methods, while the models folder will contain the MVC. That’s it! You now know exactly what you need to do to build a production-ready Node app. You can follow these steps to create an app that’s robust, scalable, and ready for user interaction.

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